According to personal trainer & nutrition coach Graeme Tomlinson, people can lose fat or build muscle by eating foods they enjoy, as opposed to following a restrictive diet. Nutrition, however, is a complicated and tricky topic, and anyone can get confused in the abundance of the information surrounding it. To clear things up, Tomlinson is educating his followers one Instagram post at a time, debunking a lot of popular myths along the way.

“I’ve been interested in fitness and nutrition since I was young – I used to play semi-professional cricket,” The Fitness Chef told Bored Panda. Now, it has already been 5 years since Tomlinson became a professional personal trainer & nutrition coach. The man also creates recipes for Men’s Health.

“The biggest problems that people who are trying to get in shape face are a lack of education and a mirage of false misinformation,” he added. Tomlinson thinks that the best way to tackle them is surrounding yourself with evidence-based information. Thus, the motto of his nutrition beliefs, “Evidence-based. Simple. No B.S.” Continue scrolling to check out his visual arguments, and you will definitely understand calories a little better.

 

#1 Food Industry

 

It is possible to consume balanced, nutritious food on a budget, but in 2018 it’s becoming ever more difficult when it comes to doing the same with convenience food. This is compounded by the fact that we rely on convenience more than ever – commuting, travel, time constraints etc… Why is there such a price difference? Do supermarkets want us to be unhealthy? Do they want us to get fat?…

It is possible to consume balanced, nutritious food on a budget, but in 2018 it’s becoming ever more difficult when it comes to doing the same with convenience food. This is compounded by the fact that we rely on convenience more than ever – commuting, travel, time constraints etc… Why is there such a price difference? Do supermarkets want us to be unhealthy? Do they want us to get fat? No. It’s down to the increased cost of quality, fresh produce in comparison to cheap, processed, mass made, lower quality produce. Another factor worth considering is consumer demand – our desire to be healthy and eat quality ingredients. Think of it like a fashion accessory… The big question is – how could this cost of healthier ingredients decrease? At which point in the process could a cut be made, if any? Is it a case of saturating shelves with healthier convenience foods and limiting so called poorer quality foods? Would that create the competition which would reduce prices? I doubt it’s viable. After all, people still want/need to make money. That said, Britain is heading towards a staggering 30% obesity rate any day soon…I know one cheap, easy way to get around this. Buy quality ingredients at a good price and sacrifice a couple of hours each week to prepare your ‘on the go’ meals. That way you save money and remain in control.Have I cherry picked the cheapest poor quality foods and most expensive high quality foods? I don’t think so. Selections on both sides account for numerous examples of below and high quality food on the go, where it’s clearly getting more expensive to eat well conveniently… Too expensive for some, which is a great shame. A MacDonald’s cheeseburger is £0.99, whilst the average high quality salad with various meat/fish comes to £6.

#2 Here We Are Again. Talking About Obesity

 

Here we are again. Talking about obesity. And why it continues to rise in the UK (and the rest of the world). But more specifically in this case, how f*cked up we have become in our proposed solution to it. Irrational cherry picking and outright lies are vomited into our mainstream media every day. The latest installment of the former was last week on BBC 1. Apparently carbs are bad…

Here we are again. Talking about obesity. And why it continues to rise in the UK (and the rest of the world). But more specifically in this case, how f*cked up we have become in our proposed solution to it. Irrational cherry picking and outright lies are vomited into our mainstream media every day. The latest installment of the former was last week on BBC 1. Apparently carbs are bad again

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